Trekker’s Guide

In a few hours I’ll be heading out to see the latest Star Trek flick. I’m on lock down to avoid spoilers, but I’m getting good vibes! Hoping it makes me feel better after Iron Man 3 delivered several swift brutal kicks to my midsection.

So today I came across this, the original 1967 writer’s guide to Star Trek. It’s a blast. There is a lot of great material, especially at the beginning, on what makes for good science fiction. I haven’t had a chance to go through all of it, but here are some real gems, like

IF YOU’RE ONE OF THOSE WHO ANSWERS: “THE CHARACTER ACTS THAT WAY BECAUSE IT’S SCIENCE FICTION”, DON’T CALL US, WE’LL CALL YOU.

and

The less [science fiction terminology] you use, the better. We limit complex terminology as much as possible, use it only where necessary to maintain the flavor of the show and encourage believability.

IMPORTANT: The writer must know what he means when he usesscience or projected science terminology. A scattergun confusion of meaningless phrases only detracts from believability.

(This second one would have been nice for some of the later series to follow, but that’s neither here nor there.)

Incidentally, I’ll be at the Dallas Comic Con this weekend and might meet, among others, LeVar Burton. If I do I can’t guarantee that I won’t break down into a blubbering emotional wreck trying to pass on a Reading Rainbow/Star Trek fan fiction manuscript.

(Note to self, get to work on Reading Rainbow/Star Trek crossover.)